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Brassia caudata (L.) Lindl.
Spider orchid, Cricket orchid

Brassia caudata
Copyright by: Roger L. Hammer, 30 April 2013
Cultivated plant, South Florida

Family: Orchidaceae

Group: Monocot

Substrate: Epiphyte

Habit: Herb

Perennation: Perennial

Native Range: South Florida, the Greater Antilles, Mexico, Central America and northern South America. In the Greater Antilles, known from Cuba, Jamaica, and Hispaniola.

Map of select IRC data for peninsular Florida

NatureServe Global Status: Vulnerable

State of Florida Status: Endangered

Florida Natural Areas Inventory State Status: Presumed Extirpated or Extinct

IRC SOUTH FLORIDA Status: Presumed Extirpated or Extinct in the Wild

SOUTH FLORIDA Occurrence: Present

SOUTH FLORIDA Native Status: Native

South Florida History and Distribution: A rare epiphytic orchid in southeastern Florida in Miami-Dade County. It was first collected in the United States in 1915 by John Kunkel Small and Charles A. Mosier in Nixon-Lewis Hammock west of Homestead; it was heavily collected and extirpated in the wild by 1963 (Gann et al. 2002). See IRC’s book Rare Plants of South Florida (Gann et al. 2002, page 63) and IRC's report Vascular plant species of management concern in Everglades National Park (Gann 2015, page 101).

SOUTH FLORIDA Cultivated Status: Cultivated

Comments: See also the North American Orchid Conservation Center's Go Orchids website.

Other data on Brassia caudata available from :

Brassia caudata has been found in the following conservation area :
Occurrence Native Status
Everglades National Park Presumed Extirpated Presumed Extirpated

Brassia caudata has been found in the following county :
Occurrence Native Status
Miami-Dade County Presumed Extirpated Presumed Extirpated

Brassia caudata has been found in the following habitat :
Rockland Hammock

All Images:

Brassia caudata
Copyright by: Roger L. Hammer, 30 April 2013
Cultivated plant, South Florida