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Additional Sponsors:

Broward Chapter of the
Florida Native Plant Society

Green Isle Gardens

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Veber's Jungle Garden, Inc.



Wild-allamanda, Hammock viperstail
Pentalinon luteum
Apocynaceae


General Landscape Uses:

Accent vine.
Availability:
Native plant nurseries.
Description:
Clambering or twining woody vine with glossy leaves and attractive yellow flowers.
Dimensions:
N/A; vine with stems to 10 feet or more in length.
Growth Rate:
Moderate.
Range:
Monroe County Keys north to St. Lucie and Lee counties; the West Indies and the Bay Islands of Honduras.
Habitats:
Pinelands, hammocks and coastal thickets.
Soils:
Moist, well-drained to moderately well-drained sandy, limestone, or organic soils, with or without humusy top layer.
Nutritional Requirements:
Low; it grows in nutrient poor soils.
Salt Water Tolerance:
Low; does not tolerate long-term flooding by salt or brackish water.
Salt Wind Tolerance:
High; can tolerate moderate amounts of salt wind without injury.
Drought Tolerance:
High; does not require any supplemental water once established.
Light Requirements:
Full sun.
Flower Color:
Yellow.
Flower Characteristics:
Showy, about 2" wide.
Flowering Season:
All year; peak spring-summer.
Fruit:
Two-parted pod of elongated, slender incurved follicles.
Wildlife and Ecology:
Larval host plant for polka-dot (Syntomeida epilais) wasp moths.
Comments:
An attractive twining vine with glossy leaves. The sap is poisonous if ingested, is irritating to the eyes and can cause a skin rash.


 


Roger L. Hammer
Shirley Denton
Shirley Denton