Bartram's Scrub-Hairstreak
Strymon acis bartramii

Small butterfly with a wingspan up to 1-1/8". The upperside is dark gray; the underside is light gray. Both forewing and hindwing have a wide straight band of white edged with black. The hindwing has two white spots at the base and one long and one short tail. The caterpillar has a brown head and a whitish to pale green, slug-shaped body with short hairs.
Southern Florida, Florida Keys, West Indies
Distribution and Abundance in Florida:
Rare and local near patches of its host plants. Adults and caterpillars are present all year; most abundant in spring and summer.
Pine rocklands, rockland hammocks and wet flatwoods interspersed within pine rocklands.
Three or more broods per year. Eggs are laid on the flower buds, flower stalks and young leaves of host plants.
Natural History:
Caterpillars feed on leaves, flowers, and fruits of host plants. The only known larval host plant is pineland croton (Croton linearis). Native nectar plants include Spanish-needles (Bidens alba var. radiata), locustberry (Byrsonia lucida), pineland croton, wild-sage (Lantana involucrata), starrush whitetop (Rhynchospora colorata, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), Everglades Keys false buttonwood (Spermacoce neoterminalis), and pineland acacia (Vachellia farnesiana var. pinetorum).
This species is endemic to South Florida and is listed as Endangered on the federal Endangered and Threatened Species list. For more information, go to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's species profile. For additional information, visit Butterflies and Moths of North America and Butterflies of Cuba.

Beryn Harty
Beryn Harty, 2011
Beryn Harty, 2011