Clasping aster, Scaleleaf aster
Symphyotrichum adnatum
Asteraceae


Landscape Uses:

Primarily recommended for natural landscapes and habitat restorations. Also uselful in wildflower and rock gardens.

Ecological Restoration Notes:

A relatively common understory herb in pinelands.
Availability:
Grown by enthusiasts and occasionally by native plant nurseries.
Description:
Small to medium sprawling wildflower with small appressed leaves and wirely stems.
Height:
Typically 6-12 inches in height; to 2 feet or more when in flower. Usually broader than tall forming small open patches.
Growth Rate:
Moderate.
Range:
Southeastern United States south to the Monroe County Keys, but absent from much of eastern peninsular Florida; northern Bahamas. In the Monroe County Keys, disjunct from Miami-Dade County to the pine rocklands of Big Pine Key.
Habitats:
Pinelands.
Soils:
Moist, well-drained sandy or limestone soils, without humus.
Nutritional Requirements:
Low; it grows in nutrient poor soils.
Salt Water Tolerance:
Low; does not tolerate long-term flooding by salt or brackish water.
Salt Wind Tolerance:
Moderate; grows near salt water, but is protected from direct salt spray by other vegetation.
Drought Tolerance:
High; does not require any supplemental water once established.
Light Requirements:
Full sun.
Flower Color:
Blue or lavender.
Flower Characteristics:
Showy.
Flowering Season:
Fall.
Fruit:
Inconspicuous achene.
Wildlife and Ecology:
Horticultural Notes:
Can be grown from seed.
Comments:
A beautiful and interesting addition to open, dry spots in the garden. Horticultural synonyms: Aster adnatus.


James Johnson, 2014
In habitat, Everglades National Park, Florida
Expand
Roger L. Hammer